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Where graphics card is used?

Where graphics card is used?

The overclocking systems in the PC games industry are constantly evolving with each new release, so today we are giving you a chance to see what graphics cards we had in the past with our hardware benchmark results for the top graphics cards from the past ten years. The Question Where graphics card is used? is quite common.

These are some of the best graphics cards that money can buy, so whether you want to upgrade or are just curious about the best graphics card available today, let’s take a look at the specs and technologies that these modern graphics cards have to offer.

Techradar Pro Editor Nick Pino’s pick

There are many first- and second-generation GeForce GTX cards on the market, but the most impressive is probably the GTX Titan Black. When it came out in 2013, it took gaming to the next level.

Here we have a GPU with 1340 CUDA cores. Nvidia went all out with GDDR5X and it was able to scale the memory to 1536 GB/s – which is more than what the fastest GDDR5X memory, the popular Samsung and Hynix chips from the mobile market offer.

However, it wasn’t until we started comparing it to the newer GTX Titan X that we started seeing some gaps in performance.

Gigabyte GeForce GTX 980 Ti

Nick Pino, Editor-in-chief of TechRadar Pro

We tested a Gigabyte GTX Titan Black with a Geforce GTX Titan Z in SLI with SLI enabled. The fact that Gigabyte was able to source a compatible card for this purpose is impressive.

This was a card built on the GK104 GPU and GK110 chips, featuring 740 CUDA cores and 1024 TMUs. It was actually an 8GB version of the Titan Black, the video card, rather than a Titan Z.

The card could scale up to a texture fill rate of 104.4 GTexel/s, and 76.5 GTexel/s for the 8-bit memory bus, respectively.

The card has 1GB of GDDR5X memory on it, and the card itself runs on the reference GeForce GTX 980 Ti GPU. It’s a truly mind-boggling feat of engineering and one that I’ll never forget.

MSI GTX 980 Ti Hybrid X

MSI’s Gaming-grade GTX 980 Ti Hybrid X features four display outputs and carries the usual MSI visual refinements. The card boasts of a single PCB design – twin SLI panels with the ability to run three cards in SLI, each with three graphics cores enabled – and comes with a three-year limited warranty.

The GTX 980 Ti Hybrid X features a 256-bit memory bus, a 1480 MHz boost clock, and up to 7.0 TFLOPS performance.

The Hybrid X is manufactured on MSI’s top-tier flagship GP104 GPU. It also has a redesigned PCB with support for SLI HB bridges, and the board has been given a completely new cooling solution.

A single 8-pin and a 6-pin power connector are provided, while MSI claims a power draw of just 105W. All this power, paired with a default of two DisplayPort 1.4 connectors and one HDMI port, results in a total power draw of 195W.

The card runs a near-stock variant of Windows 10 and is said to have a theoretical resolution of 2242 x 1680. At stock settings, MSI claims the card can support 100% of the vertical resolution and 100% of the horizontal resolution.

The GTX 980 Ti Hybrid X features 8GB of GDDR5 memory on a 192-bit memory bus.

One of the cards in this comparison is the Zotac GeForce GTX 980 Ti AMP! Edition Gaming, which costs $529.99 US. The GTX 980 Ti Hybrid X is the lower-end variant of the card, costing just $529.99 US.

Nvidia GeForce GTX 980 Ti

Nick Pino, Editor-in-chief of TechRadar Pro

The Nvidia GTX 980 Ti launched with a couple of graphics cards. The standard version came with a full-fledged 8GB GDDR5X VRAM clocked at 1480 MHz. On the other hand, the 8GB, cut-down GTX 980 Ti actually had a slightly faster GPU and less memory.

There was also a cut-down 2GB version with 790MHz instead of the full-fat 980’s 1216MHz base clock, and a GDDR5 memory clock of 1052MHz instead of the full-fat 980’s 1216MHz. The latter meant it could carry a 352-bit memory bus, 6 teraflops of computing power, and 2 GB GDDR5 memory instead of 3 GB GDDR5.

The regular GTX 980 Ti’s price was $599, while the GTX 980’s price was $549. That’s a $200 price difference.

I took the regular GTX 980 Ti for a spin. It was good, but not exceptional. The real novelty of the new Nvidia graphics card is the faster and full-fat version, the GeForce GTX 980 Ti. It has been one of the most anticipated graphics cards of this year.

It has been a few years since the company’s mainstream Maxwell graphics cards. Nvidia has packed Maxwell with a lot of new features, including the highly touted Volta GPU architecture, and a new unified shader architecture. I try to explain to you  Where graphics card is used?

Where graphics card is used?

The most interesting of the new features is the Virtual Super Resolution (VSR). Now, instead of rendering a 2160×1200 resolution in a single resolution and scaling it up, it can actually render 2160×1200 at four resolutions: 2160×1200, 2560×1440, 3840×2160, and even 4K. All the top graphic cards from Nvidia can handle this mode.

The card’s CUDA core count has been bumped from 2072 to 2048, the memory from 6GB to 8GB, and VRAM from 12GB to 16GB, in the name of performance. The Titan Z has been given 6GB of VRAM instead of the standard 4GB.

The GeForce GTX 980 Ti, however, still uses GDDR5 memory, as opposed to the GDDR5X that makes the GTX Titan Z. The VRAM is not expanded, however, to 16GB, like the Titan Z.

The GTX 980 Ti also uses a two-slot design, which has always been standard for Nvidia’s Maxwell-based graphics cards. Now, Where graphics card is used? is not difficult for you.

Hope You know the answer Now: Where graphics card is used?

Also Read: The Top 5 Newest Scanners To Help Your Business

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